Posted On September 3, 2014 By In Art, Zines With 1208 Views

Woah, my art is flying!

ABOVE ARTWORK BY NIRVANA SELWOOD

What did I get up to on my July holidays? Beach? Friends? Perhaps a three day digital media arts course through Flying Arts at The Edge State Library. For me, it was the perfect way to spend my week, bisecting onion (pictured above), making rubber chickens fly and creating a cat that farts when you shake it.

Flying Arts is an arts and cultural development organisation which has been delivering visual art projects and services to regional and remote Queensland for over 40 years! Flying Arts provide a range of workshops, competitions, and courses for young aspiring artists who are seeking broader horizons in the industry. The opportunity for the Artiz Digital Media Arts Course came to me in early June, introduced to me by my Art teacher and I jumped at the idea, however it was no surprise that such a jammed packed three day course would require adequate funding… this is where I took my plan, process and goal to SK, hoping that they would be able to help fund my time at Artiz. The application was a success and with SK’s help I was able to attend the three day course.

Artiz was such a eye opening experience as a young artist wanting to get into the industry it was so valuable learning about career options and skills available. The course consisted of guest university lecturers, app development, sound design, bio art, game design, installation work and a whole lot of extras in between. The course has definitely helped me gain an insight into the vast industry that art is. Using skills, and manipulating other mediums to create and enhance art has been a huge benefit for me and my art process. I can now apply the knowledge I have gained from Artiz to my practical work and installation pieces, linking sound works with a self coded app etc.

I would like to give a massive thanks to SK for making this happen, giving me the funding to help achieve further career options. Here are a few of the bio art photos we took on the microscope of a slice onion.

WRITTEN BY NIRVANA SELWOOD

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